Human Dimensions of Global Warming

Course Description

GEOG 438W is a writing-intensive course that concentrates on the human-environment interactions involved in contemporary and future global warming. The course comprises two broad topical areas: global warming impacts, which takes place in the first half of the course, and global warming mitigation and policy, which encompasses the second half of the course. Each week highlights a theme, such as the impacts of climate change on human health or greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, that weaves through the course lecture, reading assignment, class discussion, and writing activity.

This course is part of the following program: Bachelor of Arts in Energy and Sustainability Policy.

Online Course

You can view the entire course here: Human Dimensions of Global Warming (GEOG 438W)

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Brandi Robinson

Brandi is a Lecturer in the Energy and Mineral Engineering Department in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences at Penn State University. She teaches courses for the Bachelor's degree in Energy and Policy Sustainability and the Master's program in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. She completed her undergraduate degree in 2003, with a dual BA in Environmental Studies and Geography from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown. In 2005 she earned her master's degree in Geography from Penn State. Her primary research interests included local scale mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and invoking behavioral changes for energy and resource conservation.

Brent Yarnal

Brent Yarnal grew up north of San Francisco in Sonoma County, California. He got his bachelor's degree from the University of California, Davis, master's degree from the University of Calgary, Alberta, and doctorate from Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia. Although his graduate training was in physical geography focusing on climatology, geomorphology, and glaciology, today his research bridges the physical and social sciences and integrates climate change, natural hazards, and the use of environmental information in decision-making. He is especially interested in what makes individuals, groups, and communities vulnerable to climate extremes and coastal hazards.

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